Flight Information

Hi there,

I've added a photo to help you understand what I'm referring to. 

I am unable to understand how those stripes add up to finally influence the product overall.

Could somebody explain this to me, please?

Have a nice day!

The "Product Overall" is a combination of several factors on that sheet. The simple answer is: On-board Service, Seats, Terminals, and Image all go into figuring your "Product Overall".

"Price Performance Ratio" is the "Product Overall" and "Price" put together.

"Image Overall" is all the factors in the third section (seat space, aircraft type, etc).

Those stripes are for your information only and each bar represent 20 points. So 2 bars would be anywhere between 20 > 40. Now as far as the final calculation goes, how all the bars work together and what is the weighted importance of each and every one, we the players are not privy to that information.

Those stripes are for your information only and each bar represent 20 points

This is only valid for the rating. You can also see the exact rating value if you place the mouse over the bar. The other values do have other values!

The other values do have other values!

Best quote. Ever.

I'll do my best ;)

Thank you, Caithes!

Unfortunately, I am unable to understand the data. Therefore, I am unable to interpret it and modify it, so that my service gets better.

Maybe sometime in the near future, AS Staff will think of creating a platform that is pleasant to use. Now, I feel I'm not fighting players, but the entire system. 

Mururue, so let's go one by one:

PRICE - lower the price to get more bars

ON BOARD SERVICE - improve onboard service to get more bars

SEATS - put in better seats to get more bars

TERMINALS - you use standard handling so there is not much you can do. If you build your own 5* terminals with jetways (very very expensive) you get more bars

DEDICATED FREIGHTER - applies only to dedicated cargo aircraft

IMAGE - your overall image will reflect here, it is a perpetual motion factor. All your stetings affect image, which in turn forms part of settings of image of the next flight.

SEAT SPACE - increase seat pitch, for each 3 additional inches there is one bar

AIRCRAFT TYPE - use the popular aircraft to get the maximum bars

AIRCRAFT AGE - use new aircraft instead of old ones to improve bars

AIRCRAFT CONDITION - plan plenty of maintenance so your aircraft condition never drops below 70%

FLIGHT ATTENDANTS - put in more flight attendants in seat config for the particular aircraft type

STAFF MOOD - increase staff mood to 5 bars by paying double salary for couple of weeks (as low as 1 week for brand new airlines, for older airlines the older your airline is and the worse your staff mood is, the longer you need to pay double wages).

Edit: Now, having explained all of the above, one word of caution. AS is the "work of art". In the sense that you need to balance all factors for the maximum profitability. For example, bettering the seat you should increase price. While your seat image will get better, your price image will get worse. Everything is a balancing art, and finding what works for you, your planes, your routes, your competitive situation, is what AS is about, and that's what you must do. There is no one-size-fits-all approach. I have had luck with starting with old aircraft in big markets with unmet demand, using specific seat and pricing combination (which I put tens of hours into developing and refining, so excuse me  that I will not share it here). I will give you one big advise: take your time, you will not get it right the first time, not even the second time, if you are lucky, maybe the third time will get better.

SEAT SPACE - increase seat pitch, for each 3 additional inches there is one bar

That's not correct. The amount of inches it takes is dependent on the type of seat. It can take up to 6 inches using a Leisure or Leisure Plus seat.

That's not correct. The amount of inches it takes is dependent on the type of seat. It can take up to 6 inches using a Leisure or Leisure Plus seat.

I didn't know that, thank you for pointing this out. I only use increased seat space to fill in cabin to 100%, usually in business class, and always with lie-flat-something seats, so there the 3 inches correspond to 1 bar. The point that the OP should get that increasing seat pitch in economy is not the best strategy to improve overall ratings.

True.

But I'd also like to point out that even though it takes 6 inches of pitch to increase from one green bar to two green bars using leisure plus seats, that doesn't mean one inch doesn't increase the rating. Going by the "every bar equals 20" ratio, and it takes six to raise it one bar, each inch should be about 3.3 points of rating, give or take a small amount.

Each seat also has it's own seat space rating, as well. Using Lie Flat 160 automatically gets five bars of seat space (between 80 and 100 rating).

Going by the "every bar equals 20" ratio, and it takes six to raise it one bar, each inch should be about 3.3 points of rating, give or take a small amount.

Each seat also has it's own seat space rating, as well. Using Lie Flat 160 automatically gets five bars of seat space (between 80 and 100 rating).

I guess those "bars" only represent 20 points in flight ratings (ORS). As per "sk" couple of threads above:

This is only valid for the rating ---[20 points]----. You can also see the exact rating value if you place the mouse over the bar. The other values do have other values!

In English, meaning that the bar in seats, FA, service, etc. has a value different than 20 points.

Right. But since we don't have those values, I was using base 20 as a reference. I could have used base 10, base 100, or base 37. That's why it says: 'Going by the "every bar equals 20" ratio'. I didn't think it was necessary to elaborate that I was using it as an example. My mistake.

Simply put, from what I've been able to gather from things people like SK have said, adding inches to the seat space adds some to the rating, even if another bar doesn't turn green.

... I feel I'm not fighting players, but the entire system. 

Hi,

there is not much I can add to the advice/information given to you by other players.

However, if I may add my two cents... I don't "fight" other players. I always play against the system.

What I mean is that your airline will be a success if you understand how the game works. That is why players like George/Rubio, Caithes, myself and others try to figure out how things work. I agree that AS is not being very helpfull with information, but in some cases (how does the ORS work, where do passengers fly to) that is part of the game.

Other players are only an obstacle if you want to become the biggest  ;-)

Cheers,

Jan

Yes, but, aren’t you trying to improve your ratings in order to have the better service?

My purpose is not to be the biggest, but to have the best service. And, currently, I find it hard to achieve.

It depends on what you mean by "best service". If you're talking on-board service, you just need to offer a lot of amenities. If you're talking about your ORS rating, you have to start that from the beginning of your airline, using the best planes, best seats, best on-board service to get the best image.

And don't restart every week. It takes time to build a good company and to be able to expand. Just be patient and try to find the best balance. If you need some advises I can help you on PM (as you already know I'm on Aspern).

Yes, but, aren't you trying to improve your ratings in order to have the better service?

My purpose is not to be the biggest, but to have the best service. And, currently, I find it hard to achieve.

Hi,

sure I do. My airlines offer great seats, spacious leg room, a smiling staff and excellent on-board service  :-)

But in the end it is the ORS rating that counts. If I now would increase my prices with 10%, my ORS ratings would drop 10%... in spite of my high quality service. So you have to find the balance between quality and price. In theory you will make the same profit if you sell 100 small seats at a small price, as if you sell 70 larger seats at a higher price. Although I find it easier to fill my planes if they have less seats.

Jan

I think Jan is giving you a very valuable clue.