Introducing visa restrictions for flights between two different countries?

In real life people don't have freedom movements between different countries like they have in Airlinesim. Citizens of some certain countries have less visa restrictions than others. For example, journeys between the UK and South Africa are easier for British because they don't need a visa to visit South Africa whereas not the case for the other way round. So there should be more traffic made by the UK side.

Factors such as economy , cultural tie should also be considered. For example, both being in the Comment Wealth and with a strong tie, there should be more traffic between UK and Australia than France and Australia. Cities like London and NYC too because of their premium economy status. No doubt restriction within the EU should be minimal as citizens of EU enjoy freedom movement within the EU.

We should also note that different countries pose various visa restrictions for visitors. Some countries are more open whereas some are not. Take N.Korea and Singapore as example, the latter is obviously easier for visitors to enter.

That's not to say business in countries with a better passport, economy and bigger landmass is easier to run. We should also take into account parameters such as salary level and the size of a country. It should cost more to run an airlines in the countries with higher income as salary is much higher. If a country is so small that residents of this country has no option but travel abroad , that also encourages the traffic whereas people living in a bigger country tend to prefer travelling domestically.

Within a country, naturally the closer the distance the stronger the tie is between two airports, but in continents such as Europe, East Asia where high speed railways are so popular that in real life there wouldn't be such a big demand in air.

For reference of visa and economy, there are some websites providing authorised data, otherwise, Wikipedia data is just good.

Not sure what you're trying to suggest. AS uses real traffic data as a basis for determining the simulation's traffic data. Whether it is easier to travel to one place or not shouldn't really make a difference on how many go. Countries like the UK might make it easier to travel between UK and certain countries, but that wouldn't have an effect on how many people made bookings. I'm sure they make it easier with visas and the like because they have high traffic to those areas, but I'd think AS would already have that figured into their traffic data... wouldn't they?

What I am trying to say in terms of the visa is, take the uk and SA as an example again, there should be more British travel on this route and natural they would prefer British airlines to South African airline ( loyalty member scheme counts too)

Since AS uses real traffic data, all these effects like cultural ties or easy visa regulations are included. So, if there is a lot of traffic between South Africa and the UK due to cultural ties in real life, there will also be a lot of traffic between these states in AS. Sure, AS is not always accurate; e.g., connecting passengers in real life can become O&D traffic in AS. But more or less it gets the bigger picture including cultural ties, economic strength and such.

Effects of loyalty member schemes is a different topic. I am sure the AS team is thinking about a way to include such schemes into the game, but I don't know what is the current status of this.

In real life people don't have freedom movements between different countries like they have in Airlinesim. Citizens of some certain countries have less visa restrictions than others. For example, journeys between the UK and South Africa are easier for British because they don't need a visa to visit South Africa whereas not the case for the other way round. So there should be more traffic made by the UK side.

Hi,

there may well be more British passengers travelling to South Africa than the other way around, but they also return home. If there would be more demand towards South Africa than towards the UK, ten years from now all the Brits would be staying in South Africa  ;-)

The UK has a lot of passenger demand for Australia, but passenger demand in the game is based on real life traffic. But real life passengers who fly to Australia with Emirates or Qatar, are in the game turned into traffic between (for example) traffic on the LHR-DOH route and the DOH-SYD route.

And you are right about flag carriers. Real people tend to prefer their own airline. That'll be something for the future.

Jan

Of course the British visitors would return home after visiting South Africa, what I am trying to make is ,these British visitors might favour British based airlines more because people are normally more familiar and loyal to the airlines of their countries. There are also some people who are very price sensitive and this group of travellers should have less preference to which countries the airlines are based.

If AS data is based on real life scenario, does that mean everything is set stone ? That will be less fun. The reason why people choose Qatar, Emirates from LHR to SYD is because of their service and connection etc., that's also what we are aiming to achieve in AS.

At present time, AS only has one type of passenger: the one concerned with value for price.

Which means a super cheap sardines flight pay-for-the-water Spirit-alike flight in AS can get same ratings as super expensive flight on other airline which features a 4-course meal in economy with reclining seats, adjustable footrests, and state-of-the art entertainment on-board.

This holds true for both Y, C and F class passengers.

What AS does not have (at the moment) is a price-conscious passenger, city-wide (or regional capture area) demand, which would allow point-to-point ULCCs function within Airlinesim. It is, as mentioned, strongly hub-based, and connections and trip times are part f the "value" rating flights get. I would be impossible to divide passenger demand by nationality...real life data do not show how many pax of which nationality travel between LHR and FRA or LHR and JFK. That means AS only knows demand, not passenger-nationality, and therefore it is impossible to program preference for one's national carrier.

Also this simulation is a strategic business simulation, not consular ops simulation. Airlines do not care if you get visa. You travel once you have one (or don't need one). AS uses the data "at boarding time" point, meaning how many passengers actually travel the route, now how many wish to travel the route.

It uses real demand data, not some wishful thinking demand data (e.g. a Dominican wishes to travel to New York but he cannot get visa even after applying 10 times). If we used wishful demand, we would have limitless wishful demand. And if we were to include "demand" for people who do not get visa (and thus reduce demand), we would need to also add demand for people who wish to travel, have visa, but do not have money (at the end, neither one can travel). So we would be back to square one - the current status - where the demand is used based on people who actually travel (board the flights).