Turnaround time for B737 Max/A32X Neo on Bleriot II?

Does anyone know the average turnaround times for B737 Max and A32X Neo on Bleriot II?

I know that they can vary slightly but I only need a ballpark, since I need to decide between them.

I cant give you the exact numbers as I don’t play in a newer world and haven’t played in a new world for at least 3 years. I remember that when the dynamic turnaround times got introduced we talked a lot about the A320s having quicker turnaround times due their containerised cargo. Therefore the A320 is a bit quicker than the 737. If you block cargo there shouldn’t be any mayor difference if you have the same number of seats.

It really depends on the route and what you do with it. if someone is saying there’s a simple average to be had for both planes, they’re a fool.

For best results, simply make a test enterprise, buy a 737 MAX and A320neo, and play around with T/As to your heart’s desire.

737s have more cargo if left on default, as they do “bulk” cargo. A32X are always assumed to be left on “avoid bulk”, so switching between them will do nothing. Now, no cargo in both cases will do a difference on the plane’s TA. The 737 did relatively little when comparing no cargo and no cargo-avoid bulk. The 737 on default cargo (and any planes that do bulk) will always T/A faster than ones who don’t.
As for the specific types, I remember it was A319 > + 6 min > A320, and A320 > +6min > A321. The 737s have a similar coefficient I do not remember.
It also really depends on what airport you are TAing at, what your next route is, and, * crucially but often forgotten *, if there is a difference in settings between the prior and latter flights - so if the inbound runs at a remote stand, there is a chance the TA will not shorten unless the outbound is also on a remote stand vs. a jetbridge. This becomes more crucial when the TAs are already shortened and any change seems to do nothing. Same thing with service and cargo setting.

Now, to answer your original question - look at the economics of both planes and choose the option that best works for you. For ex., The 737-800 BGW are cheaper to operate than an A320, but the BGWs cannot go more than like 1500km. The HGW are more expensive to operate than the A320. Same thing with the A321 and the 73J.

If you’re choosing a family based on its versatility - the 737-700 is better than the 319 on some operating costs, and the A321neo/LR are way better than the 73J, especially when doing long range. Do not operate the 737-700ER or A319LR, unless you can run it at a premium. Those planes are losers even at the distances they are intended for, and the difference between the BGW and an ER can be 125% sometimes on routes as short as 500km.

The 737 vs A320 debate can be endless. And really there is no answer to which one is best. It really depends on what floats your boat and fits your configs best. I prefer the A320 family because I like the NEOs and the slightly bigger A321N, as well as the separate production lines for the A320 and A321. While I like the 736 and 73G more for the smaller sector but nowadays they can both be replaced by A220s.

I would not disregard the 737-700ER and A319LR. It would be incredibly hard to build a large scale long haul network from a secondary market (Africa, South America, etc) without them. They are also great for new players wanting to dip their toes in the long haul game but don’t want to commit to full scale widebodies. You can also make quite a lot of money with them if you find them for a good price.

Yes, if they’re used the economics are much different. This guy plays on Bleriot though so I doubt that a brand new one will be much economical.

I agree with you on your first point nevertheless.
The 737 has different production lines as well, in case you forgot.

Thank you all for your helpful replies :slight_smile:

The one thing I noticed about the A321 is that the maintenance window has to be at least 2hr15mins long. Which means it is back to scheduling for me :sweat_smile:

The windows are 2h for every plane. As for 100% ratio, you will need more than 2h. On a widebody, a single daily 2h break will do - for others, especially short-range quick-hop schedules on narrow bodies - you will need usually 3h, sometimes even more.